Referred Articles (FOI) Japanese
Abstracts in English | | Abstracts in Chinese  


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Referred Articles (FOI) Chinese
Abstracts in English | | Abstracts in Japanese  


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Police students and law students: an analysis of learning styles, study models and student success
Joint project with

Dr Jeremy Prichard,  Law School University of Tasmania
Associate Professor Roberta Julian, Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies, University of Tasmania
Dr Romy Winter, consultant http://www.romywinter.com.au/
 
State of Progress: Underway.
 
Abstract:

Nationally, police officers are increasingly undertaking tertiary education. However, consistent anecdotal reports strongly suggest that police students have learning styles that are different from non-police students. Without an evidence-based understanding of the police student cohort it is difficult to design constructively aligned curricula (Biggs & Tang, 2007). The need for research in this area was recognised (27 July 2009) by the Board of Studies at the Australian Institute of Police Management.

This paper presents the results of a 12-month pilot study of police students (n=35) and law students (N=69). The participants completed the Kolb Learning Style Inventory (Kolb & Kolb, 2005) as well as a survey on study models and attitudes to study. Data from these sources were analysed in relation to student’s academic performance. In addition to testing differences between police and law students, the study sought to assess which learning styles and study models influenced academic success.

Links:
 
 
Administrative Law Teaching
Researcher: Courtney Wood

State of Progress: Underway.
 
Abstract:
 
Links:
 
 
An analysis of how public administration from an administrative law perspective
Researcher: Rohan Nanthakumar
 
State of Progress: Underway.
 
Abstract:

This article considers the question of whether a greater understanding of the public bureaucracy will facilitate a deeper insight into the operation of Freedom of Information.
 
The approach in FOI analysis to date, with notable exceptions such as Snell, Darch, Underwood and Roberts, has been to proceed on the assumption that the public bureaucracy is constant across all jurisdictions in relation to the operation of FOI. 

It is the purpose of this paper to take a step back and question the validity of this assumption in the context of the Australia. Analysis of core themes in public administration literature, combined with the recent FOI reforms in Australia provides the opportunity to examine whether a relationship exists between the public bureaucracy and the operation of FOI. We suggest that a relationship indeed does exist and that the public bureaucracy is not a constant, but a key variable in determining the operational success of FOI.

We hope this article will begin to fill the gap in the literature on this point and further pave the way for research into a finely tuned future of FOI reform in light of the public bureaucracy.
 
Links:
 
 
Frequent users of non-judicial administrative review mechanisms
Researcher: Laura Michaelson
 
State of Progress: Underway.
 
Abstract:
 
This article aims to explore the issue of whether serial applicants of FOI pose significant problems for non-judicial review mechanisms of administrative law in Australia. The last five years have evinced a catalyst for change in FOI practices particularly in relation to identifying issues surrounding serial or vexatious users of FOI in non-judicial review bodies in Australia. Research is currently being conducted into understanding, identifying and managing this type of FOI user in the context of non-judicial review mechanisms. Empirical evidence will be used to compare Australian jurisdictions and identify collective problems or issues experienced. A collective analysis of the states, territories and the commonwealth will also demonstrate any findings. The article will also draw upon some pioneers within the field of serial applicants who have varying degrees of experience and knowledge that contribute to understanding, identifying and managing potentially arising issues. A number of case studies will be used in analysing the prospective issues and the implications on FOI and non-judicial review regimes in Australia. Ultimately this article aims to generate discussion and provide an insight into issues arising from serial users of FOI and in the broader non-judicial review scheme Australia wide.
 
Links:
 
 
Australian Ombudsman at a State Level refining the model of analysis
Researcher: Cathryn Neo
 
State of Progress: Underway.
 
Abstract:

The Classical Ombudsman model has often been relied upon as a benchmark for largely quantitative analysis based on a historical approach towards understanding the effectiveness of each Ombudsman institution. However, the Ombudsman's role has evolved and been redefined in many countries, requiring a re-assessment of the most effective approach of analysis for this highly versatile and adaptive administrative mechanism. In particular any analysis needs to include the institution's interaction with its external environment, the dynamics of its internal operating structure and the role played by the style and approach of the primary office holder. This paper serves as an update and evaluation of recent attempts to develop an analysis that avoids the confines of a chronological and descriptive approach to Ombudsman studies. In addition the paper attempts to incorporate a multi-disciplinary approach drawing on the insights of previous studies that were primarily legal or political science focused. The paper then applies a number of key elements from the recent studies to more effectively understand the differences between the Commonwealth, Territory and State Ombudsmen of Australia.
 
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Freedom of Information 1.0 to 2.0: Assessing the progress of information access reform in Australia
A joint project with:
Dr Rhonda Berit, University of Queensland - Associate Professor Paul Henman, University of Queensland
Dr Johan Lidberg, Monash University
 
State of Progress: Underway.
 
Abstract:
 
This study explores the internal and external factors shaping the operation and culture of public sector information (hereinafter referred to as PSI) disclosure, use and dissemination across different access to PSI policy regimes in Australia. The benchmark study maps access to PSI (including Freedom of Information and Right to Information) practices across the internal (public sector) and external domains (information users and re-users, hereinafter referred to as information converters). In particular, the project explores whether push-model FOI (FOI 2.0), whereby public sector information is released proactively as a matter of course (unless contrary to the public interest), has enhanced accessibility of PSI.
 
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